Soup in American Food Culture – MIT Grad does a Taste Test Roadshow

Fortunately for John T. Dorrance, his uncle was the president of  the Joseph Campbell Company (Campbell’s Soup) in 1897.  Just out of at MIT, with a degree in science, John was hired as a chemist. He earned $7.50 per week and had to use his own laboratory equipment. John was about to make a contribution that would contribute to the companies long-running success.

John formulated a method to remove water soup. He was able to reduce the volume from thirty-two ounce can to less than half of that. Soup that sold for .34¢ per unit could now be reduced to .10¢!  His good work merited a two dollar a week raise.

Not long after his revolutionary product development, John went on the road offering taste tests. He hoped he could convince housewives to use canned soup. Most home cooks made it from scratch. Soup wasn’t the only thing that would be reduced. Women immediately understood the time spent over a hot stove would be minimized as well.

The Joseph Campbell Company gained international recognition at the Paris Exposition in 1900 when it won the Gold Medallion for excellence.  That medallion has been a featured element on their labels for at least one hundred and fifteen years.

gold-medal

index

 

John assumed the presidency of the company at the age of forty-one. Two years later, he published, Helps for the Hostess, a complimentary booklet with comfort food recipes, made with condensed soup. Many of those recipes are ones that we still enjoy today.

The recipe for Green Bean Casserole (one of their most popular) was developed by Campell home economists in 1955.

Product Timeline:

1895 – Tomato Soup

1895 – 1897  Consumé, Vegetable, Chicken & Oxtail

1904 – Pork and Beans

1913 – Chicken with Rice & Cream of Celery

1918 – Vegetable Beef Soup (response to feeding soldiers in WW I)

1934 – Cream of Mushroom Soup

1947 – Cream of Chicken Soup

1960’s Cream of Mushroom Soup commercial.

A few favorite recipes.

November 10, 2015 Campbell’s revamps its products to meet consumer demand for all natural ingredients.

Poking Fun at American Casseroles.

As you can see in this last video, casseroles can be laughed at or loved. It’s just a matter of taste, what you’re used to, and the food you loved while growing up.

(Some foul language, bleeped, except for the very end.)

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One thought on “Soup in American Food Culture – MIT Grad does a Taste Test Roadshow

  1. Pingback: Windus Macaroni Casserole | Shared Tastes

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