Corn Fritters – Mary Schmidt Schwaller

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“I only eat Corn Fritters with butter and syrup – simple and delicious.” Mary Schmidt Schwaller, niece of Betty Wrysinski

This recipe for Corn Fritters came from the 1949 edition of Joy of Cooking. (My mom wrote it out by hand for me as part of a wedding shower gift.)

1 cup cooked green corn or canned corn.

Drain and mash with a potato masher.

Beat until light and add:

2 eggs

Add:

6 tblsp. flour

1/2 tsp. any baking powder

1/8 tsp. nutmeg

Melt in a small skillet:

2 tblsp. butter

When it is very hot, add the batter by the tablespoonful. Permit the bottom of the cakes to brown, reverse them and brown the other side.

 

In the Joy of Cooking, the recipe begins with this story.  My mom used to read to me.

When I was a child, one of eight, my father frequently promised us a marvelous treat. He, being an amateur horticulturist and arborculturist, would tell us of a fritter tree he was going to plant on the banks of a small lake filled with molasses, maple syrup or honey, to be located in our back yard. When one of our children felt the urge for the most delectable repast, all we had to do was to shake the tree, the fritters would drop into the lake and we could fish them  out and  eat fritters to our hearts’ content.

My mother was a good cook and a good helpmate, so she developed the fritter that was to grow on and fall from the tree into the lake of molasses or maple syrup or honey, as the case might be. Mr. William N. Matthews.

Joy of Cooking, 1949 excerpt, reprinted with publisher permission.

 

Guest Post by Mary Schmidt Schwaller

bud-and-ginger

Adrian (Bud) and Virginia (Ginger) Windus Schmidt

While researching genealogy, I found Lisa’s Shared Tastes blog. It had pictures of my Aunt Betty as well as some of her recipes.  It was clear that she left her mark on her family. I wish I had known her.  We both entered apple pies in contests.  She won first place, I won second.

bud-and-ginger2

Adrian (Bud) and Virginia (Ginger) Schmidt on their wedding day. (Mary Schmidt Schwaller’s parents.)

There is a picture of a birthday celebration; the meal was pork roast and sauerkraut.  My dad Adrian, Betty’s younger brother, loved that meal.  He used to say, “If I die today, I will die a happy man,” after eating it.  This tradition lives on in Park Falls as this meal is served at most restaurants for “Sunday supper.”

We didn’t have much money so my parents had to be inventive when trying to create special treats.   I clearly remember Sunday evening Disney movies on the TV and the dining room table full of homemade deep fried potato chips and French fries.   The recipe would be as you would expect, fresh potatoes, boiling oil, and lots of salt.

I was asked to share a Wisconsin Schmidt recipe.  Every recipe I considered was already there from Grandma Betty.  Potato dumplings, casseroles, pork roast, etc.

Through the blog, I was able to connect with my California family.  I have gotten to know my cousin Mary and was lucky enough to meet my cousin Peggy in October, 2016.  It is odd how similar our lives have been even though we lived so far apart.

 

__________________

Lisa’s Notes about Names:

I asked my Aunt Mary (family historian) to help sort out the names for this post. Her response clarified why the confusion exists:

“Bud equals Adrian.  Betty equals Elisabeth.  Josie equals Joanne.  Stanley equals Gus.”

“I asked Uncle Bud (Adrian Schmidt) once if anyone was ever called by their given name.  He said the German community in Park Falls had nicknames for a lot of people.  Below is part of an article he wrote for 100 Years on the Flambeau, a local history book about the Price County area in upper Wisconsin.  Apparently nicknames were a tradition.”

uncle-bud-article

 

 

 

 

 

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Sauce Series – Taste Testing – 1 of 5

Learn the skill of sauce making.

To begin this process, start with an exercise program…taste testing. By exposing your taste buds to a variety of seasonings, you’ll increase your flavor recall and you will know what to add to develop the flavors that you desire.

(Start with items that you have on-hand in your cupboard or pantry.)

Set up a side-by-side comparisons to discover the subtle differences between varieties of sweeteners, salty flavors, and vinegars.

Sweet flavors – maple syrup, honey, agave syrup, molasses, etc.

Salty flavors  – soy sauce, tamarind sauce, liquid aminos, Worcestshire sauce, etc.

Vinegarsfruit vinegars, balsamic, white wine, rice, red wine, white, etc.

Arrange the tasting items from mildest to strongest; taste them in this order.

*If you begin to loose sensation in either your taste buds or in your sense of smell, take a break. Drink some water or milk, eat a few plain crackers, bits of bread, or sniff coffee grounds to clear your pallet.

The Sauce Series is organized into three basic sauce categories; red, brown, and white. Each blog post contains recipes for several simple sauces to make and taste.  Number three in the series includes in-depth tutorials about working with thickening agents. Finally, the series is wrapped up with a humorous cooking challenge modelled after one of my favorite cooking shows, ‘Chopped‘.

Sauce Series #1 – taste bud training

Sauce Series #2 – red sauces

Sauce Series #3 – brown sauces & thickening agents

Sauce Series #4 – white sauces

Mock ‘Chopped’ #5 – group cooking challenge how-to

 

 

 

 

 

Lavender Lemon Ice Cream Topped with Honey Drizzle and Lavender Petal Dust

302 lr web

1 cup milk (soy milk also works)
1 cup maple syrup
3 tblsp. flour

whisk together in pot over medium heat until smooth

3 egg yolks – beaten drizzled into pot while whisking – until mixture thickens

turn off heat – but while still warm – whisk in 2 cups heavy whipping cream

2 tsp. vanilla extract
2 drops food-grade lemon essential oil**
1 drop food grade lavender essential oil**

Cool mixture in refrigerator for 2 hours before pouring into ice cream maker.

Lavender Petal Dust:

Grind dried lavender buds with a mortar and pestle (or in a clean coffee grinder of food processor)
Pour dust into a strainer (with tightly woven screen) – shake over ice cream

 

** I have a specific brand of food-grade essential oils that use in my recipes.  DO NOT consume any random brand of essential oil as many of them contain toxic filler ingredients. If you’d like to know more about that brand that I use, you can contact me via e-mail.

first birthday

from ray 6 jaja bd2

mary and baby claire

Cough Syrup – Grandpa’s Recipe

Grandpas Cough Syrup  ww2

1/3 cup whiskey
2/3 cups glycerine
lemon juice & honey to taste
*Purchasing glycerine – verify that the glycerine is “food grade”
The brand in the image at the left says that it is for skin and hair.
The fine print lists it as food grade.

 

Second Cough Syrup Recipe

Cough Remedy  by Dr. Jarvis (Vermont Folk Medicine)

Boil 1 lemon for 10 minutes, to soften the lemon and the rind.  Cut lemon in two and extract juice w/lemon squeezer.  Put juice in glass & add 2 tablespoons of glycerine.  Stir glycerine & lemon juice well, then fill glass w/honey.

Take 1 teaspoonfull (stir before taking) whenever needed to relieve cough spells.  H.W.

grandpa buffygrandpa arengandpa megan

Medicinal Honey

Medicinal honey is powdered herbs combined with honey.

One can eat it by the teaspoonful or mix a teaspoon of herbal honey with a cup of warm water to make a tea.
double boiler
First – use a double boiler to gradually heat the honey so that it is easier to work with. Use a low to medium heat to make sure that you don’t boil it. When the honey has reached a thin consistency, add the herbs. Let it return to room temperature. The honey / herbal mixture will last up to a year. (It does not need to be refrigerated).

Full Tummy Relief Honey
1/2 tsp. ground cloves (antioxidant, anti-septic, local anesthetic, anti-inflammatory, rubefacient (warming and soothing), carminative and anti-flatulent properties)
1 tsp. powdered ginger (digestive aid)
2 tblsp. powdered citrus peel (A compound found in the peels of citrus fruit has the potential to lower cholesterol)
1 tblsp dandelion root (liver and gastrointestinal health)
1/2 tsp. powdered star anise (antifungal and antibacterial – it has been used to relieve coughs – relieves gas and colic)
1 cup honey (anti-bacterial – used to treat coughs & allergies and topically on wounds)

dry powdered ingredientsCirculation Honey
1 tsp. powdered juniper berry (cleanse the kidneys urinary tract)
1 tsp. powdered ginger (digestive aid)
1 tblsp. powdered turmeric (liver detoxifier, anti-inflammatory, wound healing & possible aid in certain types of cancer healing)
1/2 tsp. powdered cardamom (good smelling breath, heart an insulin health)
2 cups honey (anti-bacterial – used to treat coughs & allergies and topically on wounds)
According to Wikipedia:

Scientists have revealed that honey has powerful anti-bacterial properties on at least sixty species of bacteria, and unlike antibiotics, which are often useless against certain types of bacteria, honey is non-toxic and has strong effects.[6]

The composition of honey includes sugars such as glucose and fructose and also minerals such as magnesium, potassium, calcium, sodium chlorine, sulphur, iron and phosphate. Depending on the quality of the nectar and pollen, the vitamins contained in honey are B1, B2, C, B6, B5 and B3.[12]

When honey is used topically, as, for example, a wound dressing, hydrogen peroxide is produced by dilution of the honey with body fluids. As a result, hydrogen peroxide is released slowly and acts as an antiseptic.

Honey is widely used in cough medicines and to treat allergies.