Egg Poaches – Herb Broth & Mexican with Tomatillo and Epazote Sauce

Eggs Poached in Herb Broth

To a pan with a lid, add

between 1/4 – 1/2 cup of water per egg
add chicken, beef, or mushroom broth to taste
two shakes turmeric
4 shakes garlic powder
2 shakes onion powder
pinch of oregano
Bring to boil, reduce to simmer
add egg(s)
cover & cook for approx. 2 min or until the desired yolk hardness
Gently spatula-out eggs, placing them on top of toast
Pour remaining herb broth liquid over bread
Enjoy!

 

Mexican Poached Eggs with Tomatillo Sauce and Epazote

Bake Tortillas

1 – pkg. fresh white corn tortillas  
Use scissors to cut into fourths
Spread out in a single layer on cookie sheet, spray with cooking oil
Bake at 350 degrees until lightly brown
Green Sauce Part 1
Approx. 1 lb fresh tomatillos
Peel outer husks
2 serrano peppers, remove stems and seeds
1 clove garlic
Add all to a cooking pot, cover with water
Simmer for about 15 min.
Let cool. Drain.
Put tomatillos, pepper & garlic in a blender. Blend until smooth.
Sauce Part 2
To a deep skillet, add 1 tblsp. oil
Optional: add cooked shredded chicken
Add green sauce from Part 1 and 3 epazote leaves.

Add a pinch of salt
Cook over medium heat for 5 min.
Poach the Desired Number of Eggs

Plate
Spread a layer of toasted white corn chips on plate.
Cover with green sauce.
Top with poached eggs and Queso Cotija cheese.
Garnish with fresh cilantro.
Serve with a side of refried beans.

 

 

 

 

Extras:

 

Click here to see more flavor families of the world.

Perfectly Poached Micro Story (100 words)

poach – 1

pōCH/

verb

  1. cook (an egg), without its shell, in or over boiling water.
  2. “a breakfast of poached egg and grilled bacon”
    • cook by simmering in a small amount of liquid.
    • “poach the salmon in the white wine”

poach – 2

pōCH/

verb

  1. steal

______

If you liked Perfectly Poached, you might also enjoy, Water Element of Life, The Shape of Water Continued and PBJ on my short story blog, Redfern Writes.

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Soup in American Food Culture – MIT Grad does a Taste Test Roadshow

Fortunately for John T. Dorrance, his uncle was the president of  the Joseph Campbell Company (Campbell’s Soup) in 1897.  Just out of at MIT, with a degree in science, John was hired as a chemist. He earned $7.50 per week and had to use his own laboratory equipment. John was about to make a contribution that would contribute to the companies long-running success.

John formulated a method to remove water soup. He was able to reduce the volume from thirty-two ounce can to less than half of that. Soup that sold for .34¢ per unit could now be reduced to .10¢!  His good work merited a two dollar a week raise.

Not long after his revolutionary product development, John went on the road offering taste tests. He hoped he could convince housewives to use canned soup. Most home cooks made it from scratch. Soup wasn’t the only thing that would be reduced. Women immediately understood the time spent over a hot stove would be minimized as well.

The Joseph Campbell Company gained international recognition at the Paris Exposition in 1900 when it won the Gold Medallion for excellence.  That medallion has been a featured element on their labels for at least one hundred and fifteen years.

gold-medal

index

 

John assumed the presidency of the company at the age of forty-one. Two years later, he published, Helps for the Hostess, a complimentary booklet with comfort food recipes, made with condensed soup. Many of those recipes are ones that we still enjoy today.

The recipe for Green Bean Casserole (one of their most popular) was developed by Campell home economists in 1955.

Product Timeline:

1895 – Tomato Soup

1895 – 1897  Consumé, Vegetable, Chicken & Oxtail

1904 – Pork and Beans

1913 – Chicken with Rice & Cream of Celery

1918 – Vegetable Beef Soup (response to feeding soldiers in WW I)

1934 – Cream of Mushroom Soup

1947 – Cream of Chicken Soup

1960’s Cream of Mushroom Soup commercial.

A few favorite recipes.

November 10, 2015 Campbell’s revamps its products to meet consumer demand for all natural ingredients.

Poking Fun at American Casseroles.

As you can see in this last video, casseroles can be laughed at or loved. It’s just a matter of taste, what you’re used to, and the food you loved while growing up.

(Some foul language, bleeped, except for the very end.)

Sauce Series – Red Sauces – 2 of 5

Red sauces (tomato based) are some of the easiest sauces to start learning to make. Typically, they don’t require thickening agents and can be ready in minutes.

 

Quick Tomato Sauce

1 can condensed tomato soup

½ tsp. Worcestershire sauce

1/8 tsp. salt

Pinch of pepper

¼ tsp. sugar

Combine ingredients and heat to boiling.

Makes 1 /4 cups

 

Quick Red Pasta Sauce

2-4 tbslp. Olive oil

6 cloves to and entire head of fresh garlic, crushed and chopped

1 can chopped tomatoes

Salt as needed

Italian spices

Sauté garlic in olive oil till just brown around the edges. Add the other ingredients and heat till bubbling. Server immediately over pasta

 

BBQ Sauce

1 can tomato paste

2 tsp. brown sugar

1 tsp. Caro Syrup, Molasses or Honey

2 tblsp. Vinegar

¼ tsp. salt

Pinch of pepper

Dash of red pepper

¼ tsp. paprika

¼ tsp. chili powder

2 tsp. mustard

¼ tsp. Worcestershire sauce

Dash tabasco scauce

Clove of garlic chopped.

 

Dip meats in sauce before broiling, use as baste during roasting or BBQ on the grill.

 

Ketchup

__________

Check out the other videos in this Sauce Series

Sauce Series #1 – taste bud training

Sauce Series #2 – red sauces

Sauce Series #3 – brown sauces & thickening agents

Sauce Series #4 – white sauces

Mock ‘Chopped’ #5 – group cooking challenge how-to

French Onion Soup

blog graphic

15-20 small to medium onions – sliced
(both red and yellow)

Water for broth (as much as desired) with enough bouillon added to taste.
( 1 1/2 tblsp. beef bouillon + 2 tsp. chicken bouillon)

Saute onions in a generous amount of olive oil until translucent and slightly browned.

3/4 – 1/2 cup brown sugar

Add flour – 2 – 4 tblsp. blended to smooth paste with water

Mix into stock pot – add other spices as necessary.

Additions:

*Liquid Aminos, Port,  herbs of choice

Croutons:

Cut bread of choice into 1/2 inch cubes. (Sourdough)

Spread out into single layer on baking sheet.

Liberally coat with olive oil.

Generously sprinkle with italian herbs and a pinch or two of salt.

Place in 350 degree – 400 degree, preheated oven.

Watch closely – flip bread crumbs once browned on one side.

Immediately upon removal from the oven, sprinkle bread crumbs with your favorite grated cheese.

cache_240_240_0_0_80_16777215_KerrygoldDubliner
boulion

 

Here’s another good crouton variation.

Gumbo

image by: Jmprouty, wikimediacommons

image by: Jmprouty, wikimediacommons

Okra as a thickener?  I must say it is a little ‘weird’ to observe the clear slime (mucilage) that interconnect slices of okra like spider webs when they are moved around in a saute pan. [It is also interesting to note that the viscosity of this substance increases with heat.]

No matter – the okra entertainment value is a ‘plus’ and it is delicious when combined with the other ingredients that make Gumbo!

 

Gumbo is a stew that originated in southern Louisiana during the 18th century. It consists primarily of a strongly-flavored stock, meat or shellfish, a thickener, and the vegetable holy trinity of celery, bell peppers, and onions. Gumbo is often categorized by the type of thickener used: the African vegetable okra, the Choctaw spice filé powder (dried and ground sassafras leaves), or roux, the French base made of flour and fat. The dish likely derived its name from either the Bantu word for okra (ki ngombo) or the Choctaw word for filé (kombo). – From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Basic Gumbo Components:

Sauce:

6-8 cloves garlic – finely chopped
1 med. or lg. onion – chopped
meat | protein of choice chopped into bite sized pieces (my favorite is chicken thighs)
1/4 cup Dijon mustard (regular mustard also works fine)
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 heaping tablespoon brown sugar
1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper

Combine all and refrigerate for several hours to overnight.

In a large soup pot start with 2 tbslp. olive oil . Add 1 large package of frozen okra (thawed). Saute until brown. Add whatever other vegetables you wish to include.

In the version pictured at the far right, I used broccoli, turnips, carrots, onions and green beans. Cut these into bite sized pieces and saute with okra for about 10 minutes. gumbo

Spices:
1 tblsp. thyme
1 tblsp. oregano
1 tblsp. basil
2-3 bay leaves
salt to taste

*2 bunches of fresh cilantro – finely chopped – added right before serving

To soup pot, add 1 large can of diced tomatoes and 2 cups chicken stock –  set on low while you work on stage two.

Stage Two:

In a saucepan, saute sauce mixture from above until meat is cooked. Add this to the soup pot.

Stage Three: Additional thickener – roux

In a saute pan, melt 1/4 cup butter over low heat. Slowly, whisk in 1/4 cup flour until it is smooth and smells slightly nutty (about 3-4 minutes). Add to soup pot.

Simmer until Gumbo is the consistency of gravy.

Shrimp_gumbo

“Gumbo isn’t so much a recipe as it is a state of mind, complete with secret language and poetic license.” – Peggy Lampman, author of Simmer and Smoke and culinary food blogger. [click here to see Peggy’s Gumbo ya-ya reicpe]

 

Yellow Cauliflower & French Green Lentil Soup

In my house there are some who think that they do not like cauliflower (they shall remain nameless). When a nose was crinkled at the cauliflower answer to, “What are we having.”

My response was, “Just wait.”

We sat down for dinner, the first bites went in….a pause…

And then the phrase that always brings out my cook’s Cheshire cat smile, “This is good!”

Another win for Mom.

Yellow Cauliflower and green lentil soup

 

4-6 tblsp. olive oil
6 oz. Applegate Genoa Salami (or other nitrate free salami)  [6 oz is a pack and a half] – chopped
1 medium onion – chopped
2 large carrots – chopped
4-6 cups chicken broth or chicken stock
1 tbslp. Celtic sea salt [or to taste]
2 tblsp. thyme
1 medium to large head yellow cauliflower
3/4  – 1 1/2 cups French Green Lentils

Place olive oil and salami into a soup pot.

Saute over medium heat until you can smell the salami (about 5 minutes), add onions & carrots, saute until they are tender.

Add the chicken broth / stock, salt & thyme.

Cut out and finely chop the thick stem parts of the cauliflower and break floweretes into small pieces.

Add cauliflower and lentils to pot and cover.

Let it cook at a rolling bowl – make sure to check that liquid doesn’t evaporate – for about 45 minutes to 1 hour until lentils are soft.

 

*The bold salami and chicken broth flavors dominate this dish making the cauliflower more of a texture rather than a central feature.

 

Slumgullion Stew – A Historical Mystery

Stew and the making of it has been going on for centuries.  Ancient Greeks (8th – 4th centuries BC) put ingredients into a stomach-like (paunch) of an animal and cooked it over an open fire.

Miriam Webster

slum·gul·lion    noun \ˈsləm-ˌgəl-yən, ˌsləm-ˈ\
Definition of SLUMGULLION
:  a meat stew
Origin of SLUMGULLION
perhaps from slum slime + English dialect gullion mud, cesspool

 

National Archaeological Museum in Athens

National Archaeological Museum in Athens

A variety of cultures lay clam to the name ‘Slumgullion’; English, Irish, Pirates, Pioneers and many more. Some folks have negative associations with it (Ancestral Dish?)‘Slumgullion’ denoted fish offal of any kind. It also has meant “the watery refuse, mixed with blood and oil, which drains from blubber.  Later, ‘slumgullion’ was the name for the muddy deposits at a mining sluice. And finally, it came to mean “a kind of watery hash or stew.

 

One of the earliest mentions of Slumgullion in literature comes from Mark Twain’s book “Roughing It” (1872) where it was a vile drink served at a roadside way station.

 

In 2013,  a visiting friend from the United Kingdom (Paul W.) described an ‘If It’s Stew’ that his mom makes. “Basically, if it’s in the refrigerator, it goes into the mix,” he said.

 

By all accounts, Slumgullion Stew falls into the category of a ‘clean-out-the-refrigerator,’ ‘everything-but-the-kitchen-sink’  type of meal.

 

I think that there is no reason that the dish cannot be delicious and delightful as long as the preparer has a good sense about flavor, texture and spice combinations.

 

 

slumgullion mystery

 

Redfern Slumgullion Stew

1 large onion, peeled & chopped
4-6 cloves garlic, peeled & chopped
1 medium sized yellow beet, peeled & chopped
1 large turnip, peeled & chopped
4 medium sized yellow potatoes, peeled & chopped
6 carrots, peeled & chopped
1 can tomato paste
4 slices bacon – cut into small bits
4 tblsp. olive oil
6 cups chicken broth
1 pkg. Saag’s Asiago Fennel Chicken Sausage – cut into bite sized slices
salt & pepper to taste

Start with olive oil and uncooked bacon bits in a pot. Heat on medium heat until bacon starts to release it’s fat. Add all peeled & chopped vegetables. Saute till lightly browned.

Add tomato paste and chicken broth. Simmer for several hours until vegetables are done.

About 20 minutes before serving, add sliced Asiago Fennel Chicken Sausage and salt & pepper.

Serve with Baking Powder Biscuits.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Historical research for Slumgullion Stew came about as part of a fiction series that I wrote (Haylee and the Traveler’s Stone).

Haylee is an illustrated, paranormal, adventure. A young woman struggles to understand and control an unusual power that causes her to steal something that should never be stolen.

In Haylee The Traveler (book #3 of the trilogy) , the main character is suddenly transported to San Francisco in 1849 where she directed to find another Traveler who carries a stone with answers to some of her problems.

Excerpt:

Maybel and Song from the Bella Union on Portsmouth Square. [ Fictional characters from the book Haylee: The Traveler, by Lisa Redfern ]

Maybel and Song from the Bella Union on Portsmouth Square. [ Fictional characters from the book Haylee: The Traveler, by Lisa Redfern ]

Stepping into the dimly lit interior, Haylee was assaulted by the smell of cigar smoke and cheap perfume. Underneath those layers of smells was the cloying scent of unwashed bodies.

Maybel led them through the room, winding between gaming tables crowded with men. A few women served drinks, one woman led a man up a set of stairs, and several more leaned over the balustrade at the top, wearing…not much at all. Haylee’s cheeks flamed.

Focusing her attention away from those disturbing sights, she watched the layers of clothing sway back and forth over Maybel’s behind. Haylee thought that the dress must be hot, heavy, and uncomfortable. She was glad to be wearing men’s clothes.

People glanced curiously at Homer as he clomped along in the rear. Moving through a set of curtains, they were led into a small room with only a few tables, one of which was occupied by a tall, thin man in formal attire and a woman dressed similarly to Maybel. The hostess’s eyes met the other woman’s. An imperceptible nod communicated across the space between the two. Maybel seated Haylee and Homer farthest from the couple.

A hearty Slumgullion Stew with biscuits arrived. It smelled wonderful! Haylee would have liked nothing more than to shovel it down. But she noticed that the woman at the other table, although chatting and interacting with her partner, kept sending quick glances in their direction.  The woman looked familiar but Haylee could not place where she could have seen her before. It made her nervous.

Eating slowly, pausing to put spoons of thick broth to Homer’s lips, Haylee surreptitiously studied the other woman as well. Dressed in a ruffled, deep purple gown, dark hair swept up on her head revealed clear olive skin. Tendrils that escaped confinement snaked their way along her graceful neck.

Her table partner leaned in close to whisper in her ear. She laughed, placing her hand on his cheek. He moved his head down to nuzzle her neck. Letting her head fall back, her eyes met Haylee’s.

Haylee could feel the burn of embarrassment scorching her face.

The man stood, making a curt bow to the woman as he took his leave. “Until next time, Martina.”

 

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More about Slumgullion Stew – History & Culture

Grim to the last drop. – Word Dective

In the 1880s, “slumgullion” was apparently also used to mean the watery refuse from processing whale blubber as well as the muddy sludge created by mining operations. 

The late Eric Partridge, in his Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, sees the “slum” as being a variant on “slob.” A related word, “slubberdegullion,” meaning “a slobbering or dirty fellow.”

So the root sense of “slumgullion” appears to boil down to “unappetizing liquid concoction.”

The Lost Slumgullions of English – New York Times Opinion by Kate Manning

– Informative and entertaining piece about lost words in vernacular.

Slumgullion Fest – East Bay Express (Oakland, CA) – Pirate Food

 

 

A few more interesting Slumgullion recipes from Cooks.com

 

MOOSE SLUMGULLION
In large skillet or kettle
brown 1 1/2-2 pound mooseburger and
one large minced onion,
seasoned with a good sized slug of
garlic salt and
enough salt and pepper to suit.

When meat is nicely browned,
add a #2 1/2 can of tomatoes or tomato puree.

Simmer about an hour and add one package of previously cooked spaghetti or noodles. Season to taste and serve.

 

GRAMMA’S SLUMGULLION (TAMALE PIE)
Brown:
1 lg. lean ground beef, drain grease
Add:
1 c. chopped onion
1/2 c. chopped bell pepper
1 clove minced garlic

Cook 5 minutes – until onions are translucent.Add:
1 (16 oz.) can “Mexican” tomatoes
1 (8 oz.) can tomato sauce
1 (16 oz.) can cream style corn
1 (16 oz.) can pitted olives, drained
3/4 c. cornmeal
1 tsp. chili powder
Salt and pepper to taste
Cook for 5 minutes on low heat. Bake in casserole dish 25 minutes at 350 degrees. Top with grated Cheddar cheese and bake 5 minutes.
SLUMGULLION
Boil rice until tender, not mushy. Drain and shake-up fluffy.
In meantime, slowly fry plenty of bacon until crisp. Drain and crumble. Use fat to saute
finely sliced cabbage, onions, and celery until tender. Drain if necessary.
Make white sauce; add bacon to sauce and pour over combined rice and cabbage mixture. Stir thoroughly and add pepper – no salt.
SLUMGULLION
1 1/2 c. potatoes, sliced thin
1 1/2 c. cabbage, sliced thin
1 c. diced onion
1 1/2 c. flour
1 lg. egg
Salt & pepper
1/2 stick butter
1 qt. water

In large skillet, cook potatoes, cabbage, onion, salt and pepper over medium heat until tender. Add butter and cook until well-seasoned. Water may need to be added.In a small bowl, mix egg and flour with a fork. Drop onto boiling vegetables a forkful at a time. Cook about 10 minutes more. Serve hot.

Leek & Potato Soup

potato leek soup

1 cup leeks – chopped – sautéd in 2 tblsp. bacon drippings
4 cups water
1 bay leaf
2 tblsp. catsup
2 cups potatoes – chopped
1 small onion – chopped
1 stalk celery – chopped
1 bunch fresh parsley – chopped

salt & pepper to taste
sprinkle of paprika

1/2 to 1 cup lemon roux

to water add, leeks, bay leaf & catsup – simmer for 20 minutes
add remaining ingredients – bring to boil – reduce heat once potatoes are done.

add roux or other cream sauce

top with home made croutons & a splash of cilantro sauce

Chicken Noodle Soup – Jeanette

Place one whole chicken – about 3 lbs +/- in a large potice

Add water until chicken is covered.

Add
1 Tbsp salt
¼ tsp pepper
½ onion chopped
½ head of celery chopped

If desired, add 2-3 fresh sage leaves, slightly chopped.

Bring to a boil, then turn down low and simmer 1 hour, covered.

Allow to cool a little.

Either chill this in the refrigerator overnight for convenience and continue the next day OR

Pour everything through a strainer into a large bowl to capture all of the chicken parts and vegetable debris.

Transfer the broth back to the pot.

Bring the broth back to a boil and add 2-3 sliced carrots and a few stalks of chopped celery. No need to overcook these. 10 minutes will do.

While broth is heating and vegetables are cooking, separate the chicken meat from the bones. (Remove the large breast pieces- otherwise you will have too much meat in the soup) Cut the chicken into bite-sized pieces and add to broth when vegetables are done. Your soup is ready to serve. Add noodles to each bowl separately. If you cook the noodles in the broth, your broth will disappear!

Jeanette: I make home-made chicken soup a lot and one of my ongoing conundrums to getting the same outcome each time is how much water to how much chicken to use when stewing it, then if and how much water to add after. Sometimes I use a whole chicken, sometimes I buy a tray of bony parts like the wings (party wings, or drummettes).

 

 

 

 

 

snow 1969

 

 

Ham & Bean Soup – Grandma’s

Fill large pot with watergrandpa and old car
add 1 – 2 cups white navy or pea beans (washed)
add
celery – chopped
onions – chopped
desired amount of ham – preferably with bone

bring to boil and simmer till beans are soft – about 1 hour or more

slice desired amount of potatoes into small cubes –  add to soup and cook till done (about 10 min.)

salt and pepper to taste

serve with vinegar so folks can add to taste

 

grandpa wedding

 

bushia jaja house wisconsingrandpas childhood home