24 Hour Cabbage Salad – Kristen’s Nana (Peggy)

peggy3-web

“My friend Kristen shared this recipe with me. She rediscovered it in a book she had from her Nana.” – Peggy Wrysinski Greene

1 med head shredded cabbage
1 small onion, cut fine
1 bell pepper, cut fine (I used red and yellow)
15 or 20 stuffed olives, sliced
Combine:
1 cup cider vinegar
1 teas. salt
1 teas. celery seed
1/8 teas. pepper
1 teas. prepared mustard
1/2 cup salad oil
Bring liquids/spices to a boil. Pour over prepared vegetables. Turn salad occasionally. Keeps indefinitely.
Serves 8-10
“When I made it, I told Kristen I felt like I was back in my grandmother’s kitchen. It has the flavors of something she would have made.”
From Kristen:
“Melva Marchand Burnett Wagers was a fantastic cook.  Recently I rediscovered Nana’s recipe for Warm Cabbage Salad.  The recipe card was written by her.  I felt close to her again.  Many of Melva’s best recipes are family recipes which came from the east across the prairie.  I think this is one of those recipes.  The salad really does last forever.  Be sure to wait until the next day – it’s worth it.”
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Apple (or other fruit) Cider Vinegar

I LOVE it when I can work in my kitchen preparing one thing…and have numerous other things going on at the same time. This one utilizes scraps from ‘other things going on.’

apples

Apples or other tart fruit scraps

1 cup honey per gallon of water

Open glass or crock container

Towels or cloth for covering

Time…

Chop apples into chunks (or use scraps from pie making)

Add honey – stir to mix well

Put a glass plate on top with a weight to make sure all fruit is submergedapples in bowl

Cover with towels (the towels are to keep out fruit flies *see fruit fly trap below) or use a rubber band to tightly tie down a cloth around the opening of the container.

Place in dark spot on counter or in pantry for a month or more…taste occasionally till it’s reached the desired strength
Note: a white ‘fermenting’ scum will appear on the top [this is normal]…scoop it off if you wish…or scoot it aside for taste testing

Strain out fruit

Put liquid in a glass jar with a lid

The 'floaties' are a good thing....it's what turns the fruit liquid into vinegar. Bacteria, air, and sugar create a vinegar 'mother.'

The ‘floaties’ are a good thing….it’s what turns the fruit liquid into vinegar. Bacteria, air, and sugar create a vinegar ‘mother.’

Let it sit another 6 weeks – Voila! It’s Vinegar!jar

Lisa’s Notes:

Like many cooks before me, I have to test my results before sharing a recipe.gift bottles

I experimented with different sugars; concluding that I like honey the best. I tried different sitting times; deducing that a stronger taste will result from a longer sit – but also that the type of fruit used, air temperature, and the time of year that you make it will also have an effect. Which boils it down to – the taste will tell you when it’s done.

Fruit Fly Trap – In an open dish on your counter, place vinegar, liquid dish soap and a piece of fruit that sticks up over the liquid

Additional Resources: 

From The White House Cookbook 1887  – Digitized – Michigan State University Library

“Apple Vinegar (economical and good)
Have an earthen jar ready for use. Into this put your apple peelings and cores if good. Cover generously with water. Cover the jar tight, and let stand in cool place. Every day parings may be added, putting on more water each time. When cold tea is left, pour into this jar and also add molasses to the proportion of a cup to a gallon of water. In the course of two or three weeks you will have an excellent vinegar made of nothing. When ready to use, strain through cheese cloth and stand away. This has been tried with good results, and with a little thought economical housekeepers can make enough in one summer to last all winter. ”

Apple Vinegar from Peels and Cores – Mother Earth News

How to Make Homemade Vinegar – Mother Earth News

Creating Homemade Fruit Vinegars – Mother Earth News

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vinegar

http://www.apple-cider-vinegar-benefits.com/vinegar-history.html

Canned Apricots – Grandma & Jeanette

Wash fresh, firm apricots.apricots

Cut in half and place cut side down in clean, scalded glass quart mason jars.

Drop in 1 or two pits for better flavor.

Pack firmly but not beyond shoulder of jar.

Cover fruit with boiling, light syrup made from 9 cups water to 2&1/4 cups sugar.

Leave 1/2 inch headroom (space between top of liquid and top of jar).

Place scalded lids on jars and hand-tighten screw lids. Do not over-tighten.

Process 7 jars at a time in boiling water-bath canner for 30 minutes, keeping at least 1 inch of boiling water above jar tops.

Carefully lift jars out of canner with jar-lifter and set on towel on counter to drain and cool.

Lids should pop closed as they cool. If not, the seal is not good, so refrigerate and eat soon. These will store well for months if kept in a cool, dark place.

Remembrance:

Jeanette (3rd Daughter, child #5):
This was a case where the littlest people had the advantage when filling jars. Mom used narrow-mouthed jars so when a half apricot was dropped in, it often bounced and flipped over. A small hand could fit inside and flip them over – skin-side up – so they would look pretty in the jar.

jacob schmidt 1881jacob schmidt senior - grandma's great grandfather